STAFF PICKS :: Classic Comics Cavalcade :: MAY 08, 2013

May 7, 2013 at 4:28 pm By:

The Classic Comics Cavalcade reaches some kind of high-point this week:
JOHNNY HAZARD DAILIES HC VOL 02 1946-1948:
Johnny Hazard by Frank Robbins began its syndicated life as juest another WWII Fighter Pilot strip. Sure, there was solid storytelling with terrific Caniff-school art, but nothing that really set it apart; that is– until the title character returned to civilian life and tried to find himself a decent job. ¬†For the next 31 years, Johnny Hazard fell head first from one adventure to another. The¬†transitions between stories– plane hijackings, mistaken identities, misplaced luggage,¬†femme fatales in desperate straights–¬†were as much fun as the actual adventures themselves. ¬†Hermes Press offers two years of dailies (1946-1948) and it is a non-stop roller-coaster ride of fun and excitement with page after page of fabulous art. ¬†Johnny Hazard is my all-time favorite comic strip. ¬†Find out why! You won’t be sorry!
HELLBLAZER TP VOL 05 DANGEROUS HABITS NEW ED:
Collects: Hellblazer #34-46. ¬†Still haven’t given old John Constantine a try? ¬†Here is the absolute perfect place to step in and sample a terrific horror comic ¬†as it hit one of its many artistic peaks. ¬†The writer who would go on to produce Preacher– ¬†Garth Ennis began his long tenure on Hellblazer with this justly famous story arc that featured our trench-coated anti-hero fighting off both Lung Cancer and the Devil. ¬†This story-line is a true classic. ¬†I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, The Hellblazer Library is just chock full of great horror stories and exciting art. Try this book– you will become a JC fan for life and the chances are good this storyline will force you quit smoking as well! ¬†Chilling– and one of the single greatest endings to any comic story. ¬†For the hundreth time, I do not exaggerate.
Last, but not least…
WALT DISNEY DONALD DUCK HC VOL 01 THE OLD CASTLES SECRET:
Collects all the Donald Duck stories from 1948. Although these stories are a year or two away from his peak, the earliest Barks output is far superior to the work of almost any other comic artists. These 3 20-page stories, ten ¬†10-pagers and numerous single-page gag strips are more that just exciting, funny Donald Duck comics, together under one cover, they create ¬†a veritable text book for budding cartoonists on ¬†design a page,¬†how to tell a story and how to make the reader laugh. These are all must have volumes and if you’ve been sitting on the fence about the great Duck-Man, he is your chance to dive in.

 

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